Back to Top

2020-21 Joe Cleres/Don Sage Memorial Scholarship Awards (64 recipients) New Outlook Pioneers ($35,000) – Updated

2020-21 Joe Cleres/Don Sage Memorial Scholarship Awards (64 recipients) New Outlook Pioneers ($35,000) – Updated

Congratulations to all the winners. You should have received an email or US mail regarding that you will need to send the Pioneer representative a copy of your tuition bill that includes your student ID number as well as the address where the Pioneers should send the tuition check. This tuition information can be either a paper copy or a screenshot image that has been saved as either a .jpeg, .gif, or a . pdf file. This information should be sent by September 1. If you will not have this information by September 1, then send the representative a note saying when you expect to have this. If you have not been contacted by a Pioneer representative, then please contact Fred Salomon at fred_salomon@hotmail.com or call @ 331-444-3161.

Submitted by Fred Salomon Region Director

Southwest Chapter 136 – Eastern Missouri Council

Comforting Crafts Projects – Eastern Missouri Council

Delivery of Pioneer Crafts to Mercy Hospital and Missouri Baptist Medical Center

In keeping with the requirements associated with COVID-19, the following donations made by the following volunteers, our May delivery was delayed. Through special arrangements, the deliveries were made on Wednesday, August 5, 2020.

MERCY

10- Flannel Baby Blankets (Annette Ravens)
5- Flannel Blankets -Rehabilitation Department (Annette Ravens)
1- Crocheted Baby Afghan (Dottie Dunker)
2- Crocheted Adult Shawls (Laura Shively)
10- Crocheted Baby Hats (Phyllis Huddleston and Maryann Reitz)
10- Hug -a- Pillows (Paula Fox)
10- Palm Toys (Pat Hawkins and Paula Fox)

MISSOURI BAPTIST MEDICAL CENTER

10- Flannel Baby Blankets (Annette Ravens)
5- Flannel Blankets- Pediatric Department (Annette Ravens)
10- Incubator Pad Covers (Paula Fox)
1- Crocheted Baby Afghan (Dottie Dunker)
10- Crocheted Baby Hats (Phyllis Huddleston and Maryann Reitz)
15- Mother/Baby Scent Pads (Paula Fox)
10- Hug -a- Pillows (Paula Fox)
10- Palm Toys (Pat Hawkins and Paula Fox)

It is our pleasure to donate these items to provide in our small way, some additional comfort to your patients.

A special thank you to Sara Funaiola and Susan Smith for making arrangements for the deliveries.

Paula Fox
New Outlook Pioneers
Comforting Crafts Coordinator
706-669-0857

Submitted by council president Judy Herbst for Paula Fox Project Coordinator

Western Electric TPA Pioneers Handbook 1983

FOREWORD

The booklet is published to acquaint you more fully with the Cornhusker Chapter of Telephone Pioneers.

The first Pioneer Club formed in 1957 and became affiliated with the Yost Chapter of Northwestern Bell. As the membership grew they became a council named Arthur B. Goetze in 1959 under the Yost Chapter. In 1978, with 1,872 members, the council petitioned the Association to become a chapter. In June of 1978 the chapter was granted and became the Cornhusker Chapter. The Pioneers remained a chapter under AT&T. Lucent Technologies reorganized the Pioneers and they were given the name Heartland Council of the New Outlook Region. When the Omaha Works was spun off to Avaya they quit supporting the Pioneer organization. At that time the Omaha Works became a self sponsored Pioneer group with no financial support which brings us to today.

Lawrence Harley Luckham worked at Bell Labs and, one day, he took a camera to work – Photographs From Inside the Revolutionary Bell Labs of 1960s

A former manager of the Alexander Graham Bell-founded research and development center shares his memories

by Nicholas Jackson
January 6, 2011

Bell Laboratories has a long and impressive history. The research and development arm of Alcatel-Lucent and, before that, AT&T, Bell Labs was founded in 1880 by Alexander Graham Bell with money he received from the French government for inventing the telephone. Over the years, a number of revolutionary technologies — the transistor, the laser, the UNIX operating system, the C++ programming language — have come out of Bell Labs. In the 1960s, Lawrence Harley Luckham worked at Bell Labs and, one day, he took a camera to work.

Inside the revolutionary Bell Labs Datacenter, 1960s

Since the early 1900s Bell Telephone Laboratories, or Bell Labs, has been a major source of technological experimentation and change. Bell Labs has sponsored research far beyond the limits of its original focus, the telephone. From telephones to radar to computers, the scientists at Bell Labs have had a hand in the most important inventions of the 20th century.

By the early 1920s the research effort had grown so large—over 3600 employees by 1924—management decided to split it off into its own organization. This new subsidiary Bell Telephone Laboratories Inc. began operations on January 1, 1925. It was owned jointly by AT&T and Western Electric, and occupied the existing research building in New York City. Bell Labs was on its way to becoming the world’s largest industrial research laboratory.

In the 1930s and through the end of World War II, Bell Labs continued to expand. The company established new research facilities in New Jersey, where open land was still plentiful and cheap, and radio research could be conducted free of the interference found in New York City. The huge resources of AT&T, which had a monopoly on telephone service, enabled Bell Labs to undertake fundamental research that had only loose ties to ordinary telephone service. In 1933, for example, Karl Jansky, working at the Holmdel, New Jersey facility, discovered radio astronomy. Another trend was closer cooperation with the military, which had begun during World War I, and which continued in the 1930s as Bell Labs began working on radar and military communication systems. When World War II came, Bell Labs invented or improved numerous military systems, such as the two-way radio, proximity fuses, semiconductor devices, radar, sonar, computers, the “bazooka,” and the first encrypted communications systems. This system, Sigaly, enabled US President Franklin Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to hold regular telephone conversations across the Atlantic.

At the end of the war Bell Labs was at the peak of its power. From the late 1940s through the late 1970s, it reigned unchallenged as the largest and perhaps most inventive industrial laboratory in the world. Its engineers and scientists invented or brought to fruition numerous technologies, including the first transistor and many of its important variations. Although the integrated circuit was invented elsewhere, construction techniques invented at Bell Labs established many of the necessary precursors to it. The same could be said for fiber optic transmission, electronic switching systems, cellular telephony, satellite communication, solar power, and other technologies we use today.

Although not all of their elements were invented at Bell Labs, it was there that the long and incredibly expensive development process brought them to maturity. And while there were notable failures, such as the “Picturephone” system, there were numerous inventions, some little-known at the time, which later became very important. The Charge-Coupled Device or CCD, now universally used in digital cameras, video cameras, the Hubble telescope, and elsewhere, was one such development. Bell Labs engineers Willard Boyle and George Smith invented it in the 1970s.

In the 1960s, Lawrence Harley Luckham worked at Bell Labs and, one day, he took a camera to work: “In the late ’60’s I worked for Bell Labs for a few years managing a data center and developing an ultra high speed information retrieval system. It was the days of beehive hair on women and big mainframe computers. One day I took a camera to work and shot the pictures below. I had a great staff, mostly women except for the programmers who were all men. For some reason only one of them was around for the pictures that day”. These photographs shown here are taken by Larry Luckham. All of the captions are original. Click on photos to enlarge.

Row 1 Captions
1 Larry Luckham. Operator Manager. Check out the slide rule in the pocket and the sideburns. Hey, it was the 1960’s!
2 Lecture. “I have no idea what I was discussing here, but somebody picked up the camera.”
3 “My Secretary, Roxanne. She was absolutely great!”

Row 2 Captions
4 “Computer Operations Supervisor. Don’t let the oscilloscope fool you. Bea didn’t work on the hardware. But she was an outstanding supervisor.”
5 “Bea. The computer room was in the basement of a building for security and other reasons. There was no natural light and I had a slim budget for decorations. I also had staff with artistic talents so I bought the materials and they made their own decorations.”
6 “Computer Operator. Many names have disappeared from my memory after 35 years, but these were an excellent and dedicated group of people.”

Row 3 Captions
7 “Computer Operations Supervisor. Yvonne was another of the computer operations shift, three shift supervisors and a great asset to the project.”
8 “Yvonne. A good sense of humor was one of the things that distinguished almost every one of my staff for this project.”
9 “Computer Operations Supervisor. This was a large IBM mainframe computer around 1967 when this picture was taken. One meg of memory, 648 meg of hard drives, no video and it cost in the millions!”

Row 4 Captions
10 “Computer Operations Supervisor. Many names have disappeared from my memory after 35 years, but these were an excellent and dedicated group of people.”
11 “Magnetic Tape. Our backup storage was 9 track magnetic tape.”
12 “Programming is Fun. Even when it doesn’t work the way it was supposed to the first time!”

Row 5 Captions
13 “Programmer Relaxation. Bits and bytes and a little folk music go a long way. All the programmers were mathematicians by training.”
14 “Computer Operators. Many names have disappeared from my memory after 35 years, but these were an excellent and dedicated group of people.”
15 Computer Operators.

Row 6 Capitons
16 “Tape Library. Helen was our tape librarian.”
17 “Tape Cleaning. After a few uses tapes were cleaned and tested before being put back into circulation.”
18 Artist & Work.

Row 7 Captions
19 Artist & Work.
20 Tape Library.
21 “Data Control Unit. Karen was one of about a half dozen very smart people in the data control unit making sure that the data going in was good.”

Row 8 Captions
22 Data Control Unit.
23 “Data Control Supervisor. Toni on the left supervised the Data Control Unit. “
24 “Data Terminal Test Room. These special prototype terminals were state of the art at the time and were the first displays in which the data was first written to memory then displayed.”

Row 9 Captions
25 “Data Terminal Test Room. These special prototype terminals were state of the art at the time and were the first displays in which the data was first written to memory then displayed.”
26 “Data Terminal Test Room. These special prototype terminals were state of the art at the time and were the first displays in which the data was first written to memory then displayed.
27 “Demonstration Center. Demonstrations of the system were presented in a special series of rooms created for the purpose. In addition to a working terminal the center was equipped for a short film and slide presentation.”

Submitted by Elaine Housley New Outlook Region Director

Southwest Chapter 136 – Eastern Missouri Council

Comforting Crafts Project

The Eastern Missouri Council provides calming and comfort to adults, teens, pre-teens, toddlers and babies who are patients at Mercy Hospital, 615 S. Ballas Rd.; Missouri Baptist Medical Center, 3015 N. Ballas Rd. and SSM Health/ St. Joseph’s Hospital, 300 Medical Plaza, St. Louis, Missouri.

In keeping with the requirements associated with COVID -19, the following donations made by the following volunteers, our April delivery was delayed. Through special arrangements, the deliveries were made on Wednesday, August 5, 2020.

MERCY

10- Flannel Baby Blankets (Toni Forth)
5- Flannel Blankets – Rehabilitation Department (Donna Sturgess)
1- Crocheted Baby Afghan (Dottie Dunker)
2- Crocheted Adult Shawls (Laura Shively)
10- Crocheted Baby Hats ( Phyllis Huddleston and Maryann Reitz)
10- Hug-a-Pillows (Paula Fox)
10- Palm Toys ( Pat Hawkins and Paula Fox)

MISSOURI BAPTIST MEDICAL CENTER

10- Flannel Baby Blankets (Charlotte Stevens)
5- Flannel Blankets- Pediatric Department
10- Incubator Pad Covers (Paula Fox)
1- Crocheted Baby Afghan (Dottie Dunker)
10- Crocheted Baby Hats ( Phyllis Huddleston and Maryann Reitz)
15- Mother/Baby Scent Pads (Paula Fox)
10- Hug-a-Pillows (Paula Fox)
10- Palm Toys (Pat Hawkins and Paula Fox)

It is our pleasure to donate these items to provide, in our small way, some additional comfort to your patients.

A special thank you to Sarah Funaiola and Susan Smith for making arrangements for the deliveries.

Paula Fox
New Outlook Pioneers
Comforting Crafts Coordinator
706-669-0857
pmfox2003@yahoo.com

Submitted by president Judy Herbst for Paula Fox Project Coordinator

New Outlook Region Reorganization Coming Soon

The Pioneers New Outlook Region will soon be reorganized from seven chapters down to two or three chapters. The new chapters will be New Outlook East Chapters # and New Outlook West Chapter #. It hasn’t been decided how many councils there will be or clubs. The final date of the reorganization hasn’t been established. It is moving forward as fast as it can.

New Outlook Region Pioneers Officers and Contacts For 2020

ChNameEmailChapter NameFunctionPhone #
  Region   
Elaine Housleyeahousley@gmail.comNew Outlook RegionBoard Director614-323-3314
 Fred Salomonfred_salomon@hotmail.comNew Outlook RegionBoard Director331-444-3161
Gordon Vinerg.viner@heartlandpioneers.comNew Outlook RegionWebmaster402-953-6855
      
Northeast Chapter 131
131Teresa Gagnontgagnon27@comcast.netNortheast ChapterChapter President978-457-6928
131Teresa Gagnontgagnon27@comcast.netNortheast ChapterChapter Treasurer978-457-6928
131Kathy Henzehkattom627@comcast.netNortheast ClubPast President978-686-3140
      
Penn-Jersey Chatper 132
132Jim Heidlerjhheidler@comcast.netPenn-Jersey ChapterChapter President484-368-3348
132Helen DeAcostahdskates@windstream.netPenn-Jersey ChapterChapter VP610-404-0392
132Cindy Priceprice.ci.94@verizon.netPenn-Jersey ChapterChapter Treasurer908-707-4084
132Joyce Jordonbethjor1@gmail.comPenn-Jersey ChapterChapter secretary908-392-2587
132Jack Smythebrunonia60@optonline.netPenn-Jersey ChapterMember at Large508-7074084
132Marie Matyasmarie.matyas@verizon.net Penn-Jersey ChapterMember at Large610-434-2088
132John Ciemiewiczjohnpat3@verizon.netReading/Berks CouncilCouncil President610-927-4848
132Pat Fieldspat@meetingsoftheminds.comMurray Hill ClubClub President908-391-8212
132Cindy Priceprice.ci.94@verizon.netMurray Hill ClubFinancial Secretary908-707-4084
132Mary Bouwmanpkeys89@verizon.netNorth LM ClubClub President908-464-6561
132David Sullivandavidwsullivan1045@gmail.comNorth LM ClubClub VP973-993-1528
      
Atlantic Coast Chapter 133
133David Haughtdeh10@verizon.netAlantic Coast ChapterChapter President804-320-0419
133Bob Whitemanrwhiteman@verizon.netAlantic Coast ChapterChapter Treasurer804-360-0388
133Oscar CovingtonOdcovington@aol.comAlantic Coast CouncilCouncil President804-755-4266
      
Southern States Chapter 134
134Frank Willsfswills@aol.comSouthern States ChapterChapter President407-654-2739
134Sally Willsfswills@aol.comSouthern States ChapterChapter Treasurer407-415-3167
134Bob Edmundsbobedmunds21@centurylink.netSouthern States ChapterVice President863-471-1986
      
Crossroads Chapter 135
135Gordon Hankinsghankins99@aol.comCrossroads ChapterChapter President630-835-7211
135Jerry Dunbarjerrydunbar@embarqmail.comColumbus ClubClub President740-927-6873
135Mike DemaynovichMik160@yahoo.comWest Suburban ClubClub President630-505-0784
      
  Southwest Chapter 136   
136Gary TarkingtonGary.tark@gmail.ComSouthwest Chapter/Ret.Chapter President405-691-1351
136Donna Sturgessjjmitten@swbell.netSouthwest ChapterChapter Treasurer341-524-4237
136Bill Akerswfakers4@gmail.comWestern Missouri CouncilCouncil President816-524-4237
136Charlie Austinchasnmax@att.netWestern Missouri Council Council VP816-524-8875
136Judy Herbstjcherbst@att.netEastern Missouri CouncilCouncil President341-753-8988
136Paula Foxpmfox2003@yahoo.com Eastern Missouri CouncilCoouncil VP706-669-0857
      
New Frontier Chapter 137
137Bob Wolkinswolkinsbob@yahoo.comNew Frontier Chapter Chapter president402-291-1511
137Gordon Vinerg.viner@heartlandpioneers.comNew Frontier Chapter Chapter Treasurer402-953-6855
137Bob Wolkinswolkinsbob@yahoo.comHeartland CouncilCouncil President402-291-1511
137Steve DawkinsNo EmailHeartland CouncilCouncil VP402-319-3602
137Gordon Vinerg.viner@heartlandpioneers.com Heartland CouncilCouncil Treasurer402-953-6855
      

Penn-Jersey Chapter 132 Murry Hill Pioneer Club Projects Completed

The Murray Hill Pioneer Club organized the events and others joined in. With the masks, New Outlook Pioneers partnered with a local realtor – Sandra L. Chambers. We were both wanting to help out first responders and saw a Facebook plea for N95 masks from the community rescue squad. Ms. Chambers is a retired police officer and her son currently serves in the city that we were both born in. That collaboration was a natural. I had done some fund-raising and the money was sitting in the bank so we divided the bill between our organizations and were able to distribute a total of 1,000 masks and gloves to the police department, rescue squad and Shiloh Church Food Pantry.

The second project I coordinated on behalf of the Pioneers was to talk with members of the first responder staff at Medemerge in Bound Brook and the JFK/Muhlenberg Hospital Emergency Center to offer their staff members lunch as a token of appreciation that they did and continue to do on behalf of the family members in the communities that are served. If you read the document file named 20subs.doc you will see at the bottom of the page that all of us who were involved represented different entities — but we are tied together as church “sisters”.

Patricia Fields represent the New Outlook Pioneers as a mentor in The Chrysalis Project. All of the women who serve in this mentor program also represent specific companies or agencies that they are associated with; however we enjoy the partnerships that we share and the work that we accomplish by joining together.

Submitted by Patricia Anne Fields President of Murray Hill Pioneer Club
POB 6225, Plainfield, NJ 07062
908-391-8212

GIVING Back Press Releases
Hearts for Plainfield, Giving Back to the Queen City

PLAINFIELD, NJ — Sandra L. Chambers (Sandy) and Pat Fields were both born and raised in Plainfield.  They are two decades apart in age; but they both share a true love for Plainfield that is often demonstrated in their volunteer and giving activities.  Last week a business discussion between the two opened a dialogue as to what they could do to help their beloved community during this challenging time.  

After a couple of conference calls, they decided to partner with each other to help fill the need for PPE supplies for the city’s First Responders and Frontline Heroes (as was noted in the April 16th early issue of Tap Into Plainfield)!  Through various contacts, calls, e-mails and text messages, Pat and Sandy were able to find and purchase 1,000 N95 masks and non-powdered vinyl gloves.  

On April 16, they donated 700 N95 masks and 100 gloves to the Plainfield Police Department, and 200 N95 masks and 100 gloves to the Plainfield Rescue Squad.  The rest will be donated to the Shiloh Baptist Church “Lord’s Kitchen” for the staff that serves complimentary dinners to anyone in the community every Wednesday and Thursday, and to an urgent care facility upon their acceptance approval.  Pat and Sandy agree that these gifts are just a small token of their sincere appreciation for the work of the community service providers who risk their lives daily.

Sandy is the owner of The Chambers Elite Group, a premier real estate team that operates under the umbrella of ReMax Select Realty serving NJ residents.  She and her son Sgt. Devin Stanley (a Plainfield Police Officer) have been instrumental in rehabilitating more than 30 beautiful homes in Plainfield; and they consistently give back in the city.  They put up half of the purchase price for the masks.  Pat is an active volunteer with the New Outlook Pioneers Penn Jersey Chapter 132 and President of the Chapter’s Murray Hill Club.  The Pioneers’ mission requires volunteers to effect immediate, tangible change in local communities during seasons of calm and disaster.  New Outlook Pioneers and a personal donation from Pat supplied the balance of the funding for the PPE.

With hearts that value the City, Pat and Sandy are committed to supporting the friends, families, leaders and businesses that are determined to return Plainfield to her esteemed designation as the “Queen City”.

Sign Up for Plainfield Newsletter

Our newsletter delivers the local news that you can trust.

Provided Lunch for 65 Medical Emergency Staff Members at the Muhlenberg Emergency Facility in Plainfield and Medemerge in Greenbrook. June, 2020

Four Plainfield residents, friends and members of Shiloh Baptist Church Ministry of 1st Impressions teamed up to PARTNER with Mr. Subs Plainfield Avenue, South Plainfield, NJ to honor some local Frontline Heroes. Pat Fields, Tonya McNeil, Joylette Mills-Ransome, and Leana Walcott provided lunch for 65 medical emergency staff members at the Muhlenberg Emergency Facility in Plainfield and Medemerge in Greenbrook. Three of the friends have personally experienced exceptional service at Medemerge prior to and during this COVID19 pandemic. All of them are very grateful for the extraordinary work provided by the Muhlenberg staff. Joylette stated that “it’s a blessing to know that excellent care assistance is available to the residents of Plainfield and surrounding communities.”

Pat is President of the New Outlook Pioneers – Penn Jersey Chapter 132 Murray Hill Club
Joylette is a Council Woman for the Plainfield City Council
Tonya is the Treasurer of Celebrate Women Celebrate You and The Chrysalis Project
Leana is President of Celebrate Women, Celebrate You and The Chrysalis Project

Chrysalis Project Inc. Honor Five Graduates and Scholarship Awards

PRESS RELEASE
Media Contact:  Pat Fields
pat@meetingsoftheminds.com
908-391-8212  
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Chrysalis Project Inc., (TCP) Board of Directors hosted a socially responsible (everyone wore masks w/the exception of a few photo-ops) garden party honoring their first class of girls to graduate from high school on Monday June 29, 2020 at 7:00PM. The five honorees have been active, committed participants in TCP mentorship program throughout their years in high school. Each one has demonstrated a powerful, yet heart-warming transformation from the shy, reserved girls with some visible insecurities, fears and attitudes that we initially met. They are now a group of young ladies with passions for excellence, personal drive, determination and knowledge that they can achieve their goals, and a full awareness that all of their dreams are within their reach – – knowing that they just have to work smart and go for it.

  • Ms. Charlene Hill Ms. Hill will study Political Science at Benedict College, SC
  • Ms. Jordyn Jones Ms. Jones studies will major in Education at Kean University, NJ
  • Ms. Leilani Leaston Ms. Leaston will study Journalism at Temple University, PA
  • Ms. Stevanie Rhim Ms. Rhim will study Mass Communications at Bowie State College, MD
  • Ms. Gysselle Terry Ms. Terry will study Business Management at Montclair State College, NJ

At the celebration, each honoree was joined by her parents/guardians at her personal table that had a serving platter containing a light supper for the family. During the short program, each honoree received:
• A beautiful “favorite colored” trunk with nearly 100 college campus required and some non-essential products including but not limited to: sheets, comforters, towels, utensils, sewing kits, laundry baskets, cleaning and laundry products, etc.
• The first installment of their $5,000 scholarship award
• An award certificate
• Personal Gifts from board members
• Individual congratulatory signs

The Chrysalis Project is the brain-child of its Founder and President, Mrs. Leana Walcott of Plainfield, NJ. Leana envisioned a program that would teach junior and high school girls living in underserved communities how to prepare for education experiences beyond high school. Her goal for each student is that they will grow to be positive, professional, giving women who will make viable contributions in the places where they live and work. When asked how she expected to accomplish her goal she said “TCP offers personal development, career building opportunities, exposure to the arts, health and wellness education, and science, technology, engineering & math (STEAM) programs.” That has been the model for the current graduates and it is working extremely well.

The Chrysalis Project a 501(c)3 not-for-profit program that is free to all participants through generous donations, fundraising, grant writing and the exceptional support and commitment of TCP Board Members: Geraldine Agurs, Cathy Brimmer, Sondra Clark, Patricia Fields, Linda Hines, Karen Holloway, Marie Joyner, Tonya McNeil, Patrice Simms, and Lydia Troutman.

Tax deductible contributions are accepted with checks payable to: The Chrysalis Project, Inc. and mailed to: 1215 Martine Avenue, Plainfield, NJ 07060 or visit our website at https://chrysalisprojectinc.com

Submitted by Patricia Anne Fields President of Murray Hill Pioneer Club